1. Before today’s epic overtime upset of No. 1 Indiana was even in the books, Butler president James Danko was asked the obvious question about his program’s future in the Atlantic 10 conference.
According to the Associated Press, his reply was something along the lines of the classic phrasing used when national security is involved – he could neither confirm nor deny the existence of his possible interest in moving Butler to the as-yet-nonexistent, theoretical basketball-centric league that may or may not be formed by the so-called Catholic Seven. A league that may or may not stretch from Maine to Washington State, if the rumors are true, and depending on who you believe.
(via Butler president plays coy about realignment | CollegeBasketballTalk)

    Before today’s epic overtime upset of No. 1 Indiana was even in the books, Butler president James Danko was asked the obvious question about his program’s future in the Atlantic 10 conference.

    According to the Associated Press, his reply was something along the lines of the classic phrasing used when national security is involved – he could neither confirm nor deny the existence of his possible interest in moving Butler to the as-yet-nonexistent, theoretical basketball-centric league that may or may not be formed by the so-called Catholic Seven. A league that may or may not stretch from Maine to Washington State, if the rumors are true, and depending on who you believe.

    (via Butler president plays coy about realignment | CollegeBasketballTalk)

  2. My take on who should join the so-called Catholic Seven to form a basketball league: 
“New members should be invited based on their ability to fit in with the aforementioned strengths, with one caveat: the league should have a reasonable geographical footprint, extending no farther west than the Chicago/Milwaukee outpost already established in the core group.
With those strictures in place, the following members should be invited:• Butler. The Indianapolis market, historical and recent basketball success, Brad Stevens and Hinkle Fieldhouse make the Bulldogs a perfect fit.• Temple. The natural rivalry between Villanova and Temple strengthens the league’s metro base.• Virginia Commonwealth. Richmond is not the biggest media market, but Shaka Smart and his up-tempo style of play will energize the league, giving it a youthful hipness no other potential member can provide.• Xavier. Losing Cincinnati to the football-loving crowd hurts. Bringing in the Bearcats’ natural rival is a great basketball decision, and allows the new league to keep fans in the Queen City.• Detroit. The league’s profile has already extended across the Rust Belt’s biggest cities, so it makes sense to grab this media market as well. Ray McCallum has the team on the right track on Dick Vitale Court, as well.• George Mason. Another nod to the D.C. metro area, a new rivalry for Georgetown and a strong history make this one a good choice.• Cleveland State. Locking up an East Coast/Rust Belt core makes the most sense. The Vikings have had some tourney success and bring Cleveland’s TVs into the mix.
This leaves the league with 14 teams, a sensible geographic footprint, and a rich basketball product. For now, teams like Creighton and Davidson, while admittedly high in basketball tradition, do not make the grade. Travel constraints and questionable media markets make them initially unattractive, though their national profile merits inclusion in the discussion.”
(via CBT Exam Week Essays: What to do with the Big East? | CollegeBasketballTalk)

    My take on who should join the so-called Catholic Seven to form a basketball league: 

    New members should be invited based on their ability to fit in with the aforementioned strengths, with one caveat: the league should have a reasonable geographical footprint, extending no farther west than the Chicago/Milwaukee outpost already established in the core group.

    With those strictures in place, the following members should be invited:
    Butler. The Indianapolis market, historical and recent basketball success, Brad Stevens and Hinkle Fieldhouse make the Bulldogs a perfect fit.
    Temple. The natural rivalry between Villanova and Temple strengthens the league’s metro base.
    Virginia Commonwealth. Richmond is not the biggest media market, but Shaka Smart and his up-tempo style of play will energize the league, giving it a youthful hipness no other potential member can provide.
    Xavier. Losing Cincinnati to the football-loving crowd hurts. Bringing in the Bearcats’ natural rival is a great basketball decision, and allows the new league to keep fans in the Queen City.
    Detroit. The league’s profile has already extended across the Rust Belt’s biggest cities, so it makes sense to grab this media market as well. Ray McCallum has the team on the right track on Dick Vitale Court, as well.
    George Mason. Another nod to the D.C. metro area, a new rivalry for Georgetown and a strong history make this one a good choice.
    Cleveland State. Locking up an East Coast/Rust Belt core makes the most sense. The Vikings have had some tourney success and bring Cleveland’s TVs into the mix.

    This leaves the league with 14 teams, a sensible geographic footprint, and a rich basketball product. For now, teams like Creighton and Davidson, while admittedly high in basketball tradition, do not make the grade. Travel constraints and questionable media markets make them initially unattractive, though their national profile merits inclusion in the discussion.”

    (via CBT Exam Week Essays: What to do with the Big East? | CollegeBasketballTalk)