1. “The Billikens have not exactly had a smooth ride this season. At the start of practices, their star point guard Kwamain Mitchell broke his foot, which almost certainly made things more difficult for new head coach Jim Crews. Then, in early December, the man that had put this team together and built it into an Atlantic 10 favorite, Rick Majerus, passed away.
But since the death of Majerus, the Billikens have turned their season around. They haven’t lost since, winning all eight games they’ve played. That includes a 60-46 win over then-No. 20 New Mexico that wasn’t even that close.”
(via College Hoops Team of the Week: St. Louis Billikens | CollegeBasketballTalk)

    The Billikens have not exactly had a smooth ride this season. At the start of practices, their star point guard Kwamain Mitchell broke his foot, which almost certainly made things more difficult for new head coach Jim Crews. Then, in early December, the man that had put this team together and built it into an Atlantic 10 favorite, Rick Majerus, passed away.

    But since the death of Majerus, the Billikens have turned their season around. They haven’t lost since, winning all eight games they’ve played. That includes a 60-46 win over then-No. 20 New Mexico that wasn’t even that close.”

    (via College Hoops Team of the Week: St. Louis Billikens | CollegeBasketballTalk)

  2. “Less than 24 hours after the passing of Rick Majerus due to heart failure, the Saint Louis Billikens stepped onto the Chaifetz Arena floor to take on a Valparaiso team pegged as one of the favorites to win the Horizon League.
Given the talent of players such as Ryan Broekhoff and Erik Buggs, this was a dangerous game for Saint Louis even before the tragic news of their former coach passing away.”
(via Saint Louis wins day after death of Rick Majerus | CollegeBasketballTalk)

    Less than 24 hours after the passing of Rick Majerus due to heart failure, the Saint Louis Billikens stepped onto the Chaifetz Arena floor to take on a Valparaiso team pegged as one of the favorites to win the Horizon League.

    Given the talent of players such as Ryan Broekhoff and Erik Buggs, this was a dangerous game for Saint Louis even before the tragic news of their former coach passing away.”

    (via Saint Louis wins day after death of Rick Majerus | CollegeBasketballTalk)

  3. When Rick Majerus decided to take a leave of absence for health reasons, the news was concerning.
When he announced he wasn’t coming back to the Billikens at all, it was alarming.
Now the true extent of Majerus’ health issues has become known. Multiple sources, including Majerus’ protege and current Loyola (Chicago) head coach Porter Moser, have confirmed that Majerus passed away today at the age of 64.



Porter Moser@PorterMoser

RIP to my friend and mentor Coach Majerus. I learned so much about the game and life. We lost a One of the best! My heart is heavy tonight.

1 Dec 12
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Details are in short supply at this time, but CBT will update the story as more news comes to light.
Majerus began his career with the then-independent Marquette Warriors, and jumped to Ball State after three years in Milwaukee. He became best known as head man of the Utah Utes, making it all the way to the NCAA title game in 1998. He led St. Louis to a 26-8 record and an NCAA berth in his final season as Billikens head coach.
Majerus’ overall record as a collegiate head coach was 517-215.
(via Former SLU, Utah coach Rick Majerus dead at 64 | CollegeBasketballTalk)

    When Rick Majerus decided to take a leave of absence for health reasons, the news was concerning.

    When he announced he wasn’t coming back to the Billikens at all, it was alarming.

    Now the true extent of Majerus’ health issues has become known. Multiple sources, including Majerus’ protege and current Loyola (Chicago) head coach Porter Moser, have confirmed that Majerus passed away today at the age of 64.

    Details are in short supply at this time, but CBT will update the story as more news comes to light.

    Majerus began his career with the then-independent Marquette Warriors, and jumped to Ball State after three years in Milwaukee. He became best known as head man of the Utah Utes, making it all the way to the NCAA title game in 1998. He led St. Louis to a 26-8 record and an NCAA berth in his final season as Billikens head coach.

    Majerus’ overall record as a collegiate head coach was 517-215.

    (via Former SLU, Utah coach Rick Majerus dead at 64 | CollegeBasketballTalk)

  4. korkedbats:

Say what you want about the Saint Louis Billikens, but they have a terrific arch in their shot.

    korkedbats:

    Say what you want about the Saint Louis Billikens, but they have a terrific arch in their shot.

  5. (via Darren Rovell’s photo “This is probably the coolest …” on WhoSay)
  6. Detective Wendigo's THUNDADOME: St. Louis University you have the creepiest mascot ever

    I look forward to more of America finding out about the Billiken.

    detectivewendigo:

    I mean seriously you take the cake.

    GODDAMMIT

    I mean legitimately what the f-

  7. The Billikens are kicking ass!

    alsoknownasmrpudding:

    They’re 12-1. It’s super exciting!

  8. Is there any truth to the rumor that Popeye Jones modeled for the St. Louis Billiken?
portaljohn:

What do you think?
- Ronald ‘Popeye’ Jones
#4 Boston Celtics (1998–1999)

    Is there any truth to the rumor that Popeye Jones modeled for the St. Louis Billiken?

    portaljohn:

    What do you think?

    - Ronald ‘Popeye’ Jones

    #4 Boston Celtics (1998–1999)

  9. Timmay Dunkin’ as a Demon Deac.
lovingbasketball:

Tim Duncan @ Wake Forest

    Timmay Dunkin’ as a Demon Deac.

    lovingbasketball:

    Tim Duncan @ Wake Forest

  10. Great story about Easy Ed Macauly’s high-revving engine at the U. of St. Louis.
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Easy Ed”
Ed Macauley was named captain of the University of St. Louis basketball team as a sophomore. His first game as captain, Ed led the team out of the locker room, ran down the court and threw in a layup. He heard no cheers, instead his teammates and coaches called out, “Take it easy, Ed.” Macauley was so excited that he hadn’t realized that he ran out as the National Anthem was being played. He earned some embarrassment and a nickname, “Easy Ed” Macauley.
“Easy Ed” won the 1948 NIT championship with St. Louis, at the time college basketball’s premiere tournament. The next spring he was drafted by the St. Louis Bombers of the NBA. He played one season in his home town before being traded to the Boston Celtics. For six seasons, Macauley played center alongside Hall of Fame guard Bob Cousy. They reached the playoffs every year but could not win the NBA championship. Before the 1956 draft, Red Auerbach, Hall of Fame coach of the Celtics, made a trade. He sent Ed and guard Cliff Hagen to the St. Louis Hawks in exchange for the number two draft pick that year. The Celtics picked Bill Russell.
The Hawks lost to Russell and the Celtics in the NBA Finals but came back the next year and won the 1957-1958 championship. It is the only championship in the history of the Hawks franchise, which is now located in Atlanta. Bill Russell won eleven for the Celtics. This becomes a great “what if” in NBA history.
Macauley, who was the MVP of the 1951 All-Star Game, was inducted in the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1960. He averaged 17.3 points per game, 7.7 rebounds, and a .436 field goal percentage. Basketball-Reference.com compares him most favorably to Moses Malone and Bob Lanier.
In a terrific irony, Macauley’s uniform number, 22, was retired by the Celtics but not by the Hawks.
(Image copyright of St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

    Great story about Easy Ed Macauly’s high-revving engine at the U. of St. Louis.

    obitoftheday:

    Obit of the Day: “Easy Ed”

    Ed Macauley was named captain of the University of St. Louis basketball team as a sophomore. His first game as captain, Ed led the team out of the locker room, ran down the court and threw in a layup. He heard no cheers, instead his teammates and coaches called out, “Take it easy, Ed.” Macauley was so excited that he hadn’t realized that he ran out as the National Anthem was being played. He earned some embarrassment and a nickname, “Easy Ed” Macauley.

    “Easy Ed” won the 1948 NIT championship with St. Louis, at the time college basketball’s premiere tournament. The next spring he was drafted by the St. Louis Bombers of the NBA. He played one season in his home town before being traded to the Boston Celtics. For six seasons, Macauley played center alongside Hall of Fame guard Bob Cousy. They reached the playoffs every year but could not win the NBA championship. Before the 1956 draft, Red Auerbach, Hall of Fame coach of the Celtics, made a trade. He sent Ed and guard Cliff Hagen to the St. Louis Hawks in exchange for the number two draft pick that year. The Celtics picked Bill Russell.

    The Hawks lost to Russell and the Celtics in the NBA Finals but came back the next year and won the 1957-1958 championship. It is the only championship in the history of the Hawks franchise, which is now located in Atlanta. Bill Russell won eleven for the Celtics. This becomes a great “what if” in NBA history.

    Macauley, who was the MVP of the 1951 All-Star Game, was inducted in the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1960. He averaged 17.3 points per game, 7.7 rebounds, and a .436 field goal percentage. Basketball-Reference.com compares him most favorably to Moses Malone and Bob Lanier.

    In a terrific irony, Macauley’s uniform number, 22, was retired by the Celtics but not by the Hawks.

    (Image copyright of St. Louis Post-Dispatch)